Saturday, March 4, 2017

Review: Lydia's Charm by Wanda E Brunstetter

I'm just going to use the plot synopsis that came with the book, as I'm not sure I can do it justice.

Lydia King has a secret admirer!
Suddenly a widow, Lydia King moves her son and herself to Charm to be close to her mother and help with her grandfather. But is her hear ready for romance when gifts begin appearing on her porch from a mysterious source?

Menno Troyer, a furniture store owner, is also recently widowed and the father of four energetic boys. He has come to realize that, though he isn't ready to love again his sons need a mother.

Levi Stutzman, another newcomer to the area. is the only one in his family not handicapped by dwarfism. and he has dedicated his life to caring for them. Though determined never to marry, he is always willing to be of help to others.

As fall colors the countryside, will the anonymous gifts let for Lydia bring her hope foe a new life? And when tragedy befalls her yet again, will the gift giver be there to support her?

Well, that was longer than I had thought it was initially. How about I go ahead and out the picture, since you're probably tired of words.

I'm giving this wonderful Amish romance 5 stars!

1: Wanda Brunstetter (along with Beverly Lewis) is one of the queens of Amish lit! This is one of my favorites by her. Her research and passion are easy to see on every page.

2: The pages are riddled with phrases and words in the Pennsylvania-Dutch language, even more-so than is usual for an Amish book. It adds color and life to the story!

3: The characters were so sweet and many faceted. They all had feelings and none of the main characters fell flat. In fact, this book had me going through the whole scope of emotions. Also, in case you couldn't tell from the blurb thingy, there is a very interesting love triangle.

4: The chapters are short and easy to read, making this book a swell choice for casual reading! (did I just say swell?)

5: This book dealt with sensitive matters in a way that was very close to perfection. Death and dwarfism are both addressed and the fear, feelings, and prejudices that come with them are laid out in a very impressive way.

What are your feelings on Amish lit? Let me know in the comments! This is a new favorite of mine in that genre.

PS I forgot yesterday to mention that the epilogue was everything I needed, almost. I kinda wanted them to say something about Josh, but that's ok.

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